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User Participation Summary Report

This Report lets you see how many people submit Improvements, assign them, and implement them in order to understand the distribution of improvement work in your organization.

User_Participation_Summary.jpg

 

There are 3 views you can look at on this Report:

  • Improvements & Projects - Tells you how many people are associated with Improvements and Projects.

  • Improvements - Tells you how many people are associated with just Improvements. You can choose whether to have that measurement of association include Authors, Responsible People, Assigners, and/or Collaborators by clicking those options above the donut chart.

  • Projects - Tells you how many people are associated with just Projects. You can choose whether to have that measurement of association include Sponsors, Facilitators, Leaders, and/or Participants by clicking those options above the donut chart.

 

Each donut chart is divided into colored segments that tell you the percentage of people associated with a certain number of items:

  • Red (not engaged) - The percentage of people associated with zero Projects or Improvements.

  • Orange (minimally engaged) - The percentage of people associated with one Project or Improvement

  • Yellow (moderately engaged) - The percentage of people associated with two to five Projects or Improvements.

  • Green (moderately engaged) - The percentage of people associated with six or more Projects or Improvements.

Hover over any of the colored segments to see the exact percentage of people it represents.

 

Working with the Report

  • The date range options are listed along the top of the page. Choose between 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, 12 months, all time, or a custom range by clicking on the corresponding option.

  • The Network diagram can be found along the left side of the page. Use this to filter the Report by Location - only items tied to the selected Locations will be included in the Report.

 

Things to look for:

  • The more people who have participated in improvement work in some way, the better. This means that you want your red section to be as small as possible.

  • You don’t want a handful of people submitting and implementing all the Improvements; you want everyone to be engaged.

  • A stronger improvement culture balances the work across a large number of people. This shows that improvement is an ingrained habit across the organization.

 

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